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Monthly Archives: January 2012

The Extraordinary Alice Packwood, A Testament to Strength

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From out of our past comes once again a story of a remarkable and resourceful woman, a testament of resiliency and strength, Alice Packwood. The late family historian, Mrs. Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson, said that Liddie (Lydia) Bullock’s father was a Brister, related to  Washington (Wash) Brister, later of Tylertown, Walthall County, Mississippi. I am still searching for her father.

The white Bristers of Lincoln County, Mississippi  were pioneer planters. I imagine that Alice so hated slavery that she ran to freedom not soon after the Great War broke out. Her last child during this period was born in the later stages of the war in 1864, ELIZA. The war had began in April 1861.There was a slave contraband camp around Bogue Chitto, the Big Creek, in Lawrence or Lincoln County where Big John’s sister in law, Deliah, worked during the war. Alice’s run for sanctuary and freedom must have ended in that contraband camp.

In 1870, Wash had adopted the surname Brister which would indicate one of the Brister Plantations as his last place of bondage in Lincoln County. In that same year, Wash was found working as a child house servant in Holmesville, Pike County, which was the station of about 100 Black Union Troops overseeing the transition from Slavery to Freedom and Reconstruction in Marion and Pike County. I envision that Wash and his family had followed the protection of Union Troops out of the Lawrence/Lincoln Slave Contraband Camps, which is where I assume that Alice had come in contact with the Black Bristers before her marriage.

Liddie, as she was commonly called, was my grandfather’s (John Bullock) mother. Family spoken folklore said that  Liddie’s mother was Alice Packwood.  The folklore of my family was confirmed when I found Liddie (Lydia) with her mother Alice in Lawrence County, Mississippi in the 1870 U.S. Census. The above is a picture of non-oppressed beauty, glory, charm and grace. It is not Alice Packwood but only a presentation of the beautiful and strong women that were once subjected to the ravages of human bondage.

My impression is that Alice was an extraordinary woman of superior strength, intelligence, independence, character and faith. Alice was robust and resourceful. She was found most of the time in and about Lawrence and Pike County working as a farm hand free and independent of men. In 1870, she was approximately 35 years old and appeared to have five (5) children.

My great grandmother, Liddie, had been the first of her children born free. I believe Liddie was actually born in Lincoln or Lawrence County sometime before the end of the Civil War in February 1865. At least, that is what she had reported in the 1900 U.S. Census. However, Liddie’s birthday around 1868 would also be of some historical significance. It would have been a couple of years after the war and the beginning of Reconstruction and some return to regional peace and family stability.

On June 27, 1870, Alice (Youngblood), age 35, married Benjamin Hammons, but appeared to be living alone with some of her children working as a farmhand in Lawrence County.

In 1870, Alice was residing with John Hammons, age 9 (br. 1861), Peter Hammons, age 5 (br. 1865) and Lydia (Liddie) Hammons (br. 1868). I couldn’t locate any information on Ben Hammons. Alice’s daughter Louise (Lucy) Packwood, age 18 (br. 1852), and son, James Packwood, age 8 (br. 1862), were living in Marion County among the House of Moses and the Bullock-Youngblood Clan with John Youngblood, age 30 (br. 1840).

In the June 1870 U.S. Census, plantation owner, Hubert (Hugh) Bullock, was at house 199, John Youngblood with Alice and James were at house 202, James Bullock, the elder, was at 207, and Moses, the Patriarch of the Bullock-Youngblood Family, was at 209. John Youngblood could have been one of Moses’ sons, Notorious Jake Bullock’s uncle. However more than likely, John may have been Judy Youngblood, age 55 (br. 1815) or Amos Youngblood’s, age 52 (br. 1818) son.

Judy and Amos was down the road at 208 and 210. Alice’s children association with the House of Moses and the Bullock-Youngblood Family Group establish that she at one time had been very close to the family in bondage and left her children within this support group at sometime at the start of the Great War. However, keep in mind that Lucy was nevertheless most likely a true “Youngblood.”  

In the 1880 U.S. Census, Alice, age 45 (br. 1835) is back in Pike County under the name of Alice Hammons. Lucy Hammons, age 25 (br. 1855) is back with Alice. Listed as daughters residing with her was Elizabeth Hammons, age 16 (br. 1864), Liddia (Liddie) Hammons, age 12 (br. 1868), Peter Hammons, age 10 (br. 1870), Angeline (Azalin), age 6 (br. 1874) and John Hammons, age 2 (br. 1878) Grandson. Her son, James Packwood, (br. 1862) would have been 18 and living apart from the family.

At this time, Alice is reported to be a widow. Ben Hammons had passed to the otherside between June 1870 and June 1880.

The Scars and Eyes of Human Bondage

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Above, these are actual true eyes of the savagery human bondage from a beautiful young woman from American Slavery. In her eyes, you can also see absolute dissociation from the unworldiless (Other World ) of Human Bondage.

The Slave Mother (1854)

By Frances E. W. Harper (1825-1911)

Heard you that shriek? It rose
So wildly on the air,
It seemed as if a burden’d heart
Was breaking in despair.

Saw you those hands so sadly clasped–
The bowed and feeble head–
The shuddering of that fragile form–
That look of grief and dread?

Saw you the sad, imploring eye?
Its every glance was pain,
As if a storm of agony
Were sweeping through the brain.

She is a mother pale with fear,
Her boy clings to her side,
And in her kirtle vainly tries
His trembling form to hide.

He is not hers, although she bore
For him a mother’s pains;
He is not hers, although her blood
Is coursing through his veins!

He is not hers, for cruel hands
May rudely tear apart
The only wreath of household love
That binds her breaking heart.

His love has been a joyous light
That o’er her pathway smiled,
A fountain gushing ever new,
Amid life’s desert wild.

His lightest word has been a tone
Of music round her heart, Their lives a streamlet blent in one–
Oh, Father! must they part?

They tear him from her circling arms,
Her last and fond embrace.
Oh! never more may her sad eyes
Gaze on his mournful face.

No marvel, then, these bitter shrieks
Disturb the listening air:
She is a mother, and her heart
Is breaking in despair.

She, above, is not unlike the unworldly perils seen, pain suffered and experienced by Alice Packwood in bondage. Family history and folklore provided by her late granddaughter, Corine Bullock (br. 1901), Alice had been separated from her family at an early age. It was so early and painful that she had no memory of them. As a child, Alice suffered greatly from the pain of her separation from her family, and cruelty of human bondage.

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As a young child, she was a fan bearer for a cruel and mean family. A fan bearer was a house job. It was usually a young child.  His or her duty was to stand with a large flume of feathers affixed to a pole or rod and constantly fan and cool a subject of the plantation owner’s family. The fan bearer was under constant and inhumane pressure to remain standing and alert for hours.

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If the fan bearer fell from sleep, exhaustion, hunger or pain, he or she was severely beaten or punished. Clues from slave schedules suggest that the Extraordinary Alice Packwood in her infancy may have been subjected to Human Bondage on the plantation of Benjamin Youngblood in Marion County, Mississippi. Alice was born in Mississippi in 1830 about the same time as Big John.

In 1850, Mississippi Slave Schedules from the plantation of Benjamin and Joseph Youngblood show a twenty year old female in bondage. Slave schedules recorded no other information about people held in bondage other than age and gender, but the slave records were consistent with a young lady of Alice’s age being subjected on the Youngblood plantation. It is extremely important to always keep in mind  that the Youngblood Plantation was adjacent to Hugh Bullock’s Plantation someplace near the town of Columbia, Marion County along a fertile river crescent.

After the abolition of slavery, Alice and Lucy used both Youngblood and Packwood as their surnames until Hammons’ marriage. Lucy Youngblood, Alice’s eldest known daughter, was born sometime between 1852-1855 on the Youngblood Plantation in servitude, a child of the Other World.

I believe that it is safe to assume that Alice being a robust and fertile woman had become separated from Lucy while in bondage from the Youngblood plantation. The most likely last place of Alice’s bondage by the clue of the surname that she adopted after the abolition of slavery was on the plantation of Dudley W. Packwood,  most likely inherited by his son, Joseph H. Packwood.

Dudley Packwood arrived rather late in Pike County in about 1850. He first settled on the farm of an early Pike County settler, Ralph Stovall. Dudley was born in 1782 in New London, Connecticut. He traveled to New Orleans, and was in the Battle of New Orleans with Andrew Jackson. He lived in Louisiana and Alabama before migrating to Mississippi. Dudley’s father, Joseph, was a sea captain during the Revolutionary War. Dudley’s wife was Catherine Elliot, born 1803 in Maryland. Dudley lived in region of Pike County called China Grove. He died sometime in 1860 at 76, Catherine died sometime in 1873.

Recall that Lucy Youngblood was born sometime around 1854. It is possible that Alice suffered another painful separation from family soon after the birth of Lucy. Dudley’s eldest son, Joseph H. Packwood, born 1836, was also a farmer and merchant and spent his life in China Grove, Pike County from 1850 to his death in 1900.

Joseph married Mary Youngblood, born 1844. Mary was the daughter of Joseph Youngblood above, and Eliza Bickham. It is possible that Alice may have followed Mary as dowry, the property which a woman brings her husband at marriage. Lucy most probably remained on the Youngblood plantation. We know that the eldest son of Joseph and Mary Packwood was born July 3, 1863.

In 1860, Dudley had 13 human beings subjected on his farm. The oldest female in servitude was a 22 year old mulatto. Alice would been about 30 years old. Therefore, Alice may have arrived on the Packwood farm sometime after 1860. It is likely, and most probable that Mary Youngblood and Joseph Packwood was married sometime in 1862 after Mary’s eighteen birthday, and Alice followed Mary as “dowry”. Recall that Alice’s son, Peter, was born in 1862 in bondage as a “Packwood.”  It is also likely that Alice’s daughter, ELIZA (br. 1864) may also have been born on the Packwood Plantation.  

In 1870, 5 (five) years from abolition of slavery, Alice was a farm hand in Lawrence County working on the plantation of Joseph Youngblood, one of Ben Youngblood’s sons.

Another clue as to Alice’s last place of bondage on the Packwood Plantation involves again, Notorious Jake.  In 1880, Alice and her family had moved back to Pike County. Her husband, Ben Hammons, had passed. At some point in 1880, Jake rode up. Jake had to have known Alice and the kids from one of the surrounding Youngblood-Packwood plantations, Ante Bellum Bondage.

Jake most likely would have been on horse back. He would have made quite an early lasting impression on 10 or 12 year old Liddie. A brief description of Jake as dark with long straight jet black hair came from his son, Sam Bullock, who later adopted the surname “Quinn.” Sam and my grandfather, John Bullock, were close as brothers should be and equally perplexed about being the seed of Notorious Jake. There wasn’t much difference between their ages. They bonded with each other for a lifetime of brotherhood, moral support and comfort. Sam and John married sisters, Ethel and Ida, from the morally strict and deeply religious Alex-Miley McGowen Family of Pike County.

I imagine that Jake was long and tall like my grandfather. John stood about 6.3 feet. Jake was lean and tall, dark and handsome with long straight jet black hair. He was iron chiseled muscular with a straight back and haunting piecing dark brown-deep penerating and spiritual eyes like his daughter, Josie Bullock, above, that seemed to see through you.

Jake would have rode up to Alice’s place morning, day or night. Jake was vain. Jake was out of the House of Moses. During the Great War, Pike and Marion Counties wasn’t touched much other than the loss of white males that entered the war on the side of Confederacy. Union troops destroyed some of railroad stations around Columbia, Mississippi near the plantation, but there wasn’t very much other action in the area. After the war, plantation owners Hugh Bullock and Hosea Davis were still among the wealthy and influential planter class. Jake’s grandfather, Moses Bullock, was also considerately well off as an ex-bondsman.  In 1870, between Moses and his son, Amos Youngblood, reported about $1,000 in assets.

At Jake’s back was Big John and Ellen and the House of Moses. They appeared to be the backbone of the wealthly and influential planter class of Marion and Pike County. Jake was vain. He wasn’t beyond throwing his weight around the county.

Out of the Alice and Jake union, a son was born. Alice named him, Dudley. Dudley Packwood? In 1920, Dudley (Dud) was found residing in Pike County with his wife, Lada (Leola), age 35 (br. 1885), Hattie, age 13 (br. 1907), Mattie, age 11 (br. 1909), John, age 7 (br. 1913), Bennee, age 5 (br. 1915) and Della, age 3 months (br. 1920).  Mrs. Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson reported that Dud’s son, John, had moved to California and lost touch.

O.D. Smith, son of Angeline Bullock-Smith (br. 1884), the daughter of Liddie and George Bullock, said that Dud was part of the infamous “Bullock Boys” at the turn of the century. He said that “Dud, Levi, John and Lonzo. were too touch for me!” O.D. thought that Pack Bullock (Notorious Jake) was his grandfather instead of George, Sr. Recall that George, Jr. was was born in 1893 so I believe that George was Angeline’s father.But O.D. would know more than I about his mother. Angeline passed around 1937.

It is possible that Liddie most likely first met her future husband, George Bullock (br. 1861) of Lincoln-Lawrence County with Jake during the early 1880s. Both George and Jake rode together. They were extremely handsome young men of the time, and part of the 19th Century infamous “Bullock Boys.”

One thing is historically cystral clear, Lidde Brister-Bullock loved the “Bullock Boys.” At this time, I have been unable to find when and where the Remarkable Alice passed or the fate of any of Liddie’s brothers and sisters. Alice was an extremely strong and remarkable woman of her time forever scarred by human bondage. I call her name once again, GREAT-GREAT GRANDMOTHER, ALICE PACKWOOD, YOU WERE AN EXTRAORDINARY HUMAN BEING.  

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THE HOUSE OF MOSES, Moses & Caroline Bullock-Youngblood, Classic Family Roots

FAMILY LEGACY NOTES/ Copyright 1998, Rayford Bullock

The House of Moses & Freedom from Slavery

It is absolutely prophetic and a testament to faith that we find “A Man Called Moses” at the head leading the Anti-Bellum Black Bullock Family group out of human bondage.

In 1870 and 1880, I find it remarkable and extraordinary that a man named Moses and his faithful helpmate and wife, Caroline Youngblood, at the center and the beacon of a large extended family grouping of freed Bullocks and Youngbloods in the Deep South of Marion County, Mississippi.

At the abolition of slavery, families were reunited. In many instances, family and close relatives could be found on U.S. Censuses within the immediate area. Additionally, many freedmen adopted the surname of their last plantation owner. Some created their own surnames such as Moses, Freedman, Liberty, etc. rejecting the surnames and association with their enslavers.

On June 27, 1870, just 5 years after the Abolition of Slavery, the Great Civil War and the Assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, a man called “Moses” aged 85, appeared to be the cornerstone of families in transition at one of America’s most perilous-troubled times and turning points in history, the Abolition of the Institution of Slavery.

In the 1870 U.S. Census, at No. 209, Moses and Carey (Caroline) Youngblood, Age 60, was living with Julie, age 30 (br. 1840), Clovina, age 23 (br. 1847), Jane, age 15 (br. 1855), Lacey, age 10 (br. 1860), Rose, age 4 (br. 1866), and Monroe, age 2 (br. 1868). Judy Youngblood, age 55 (br. 1815) and Amos Youngblood, age 52 (br. 1818) and their families were at 208 and 210.

James, the elder, age 30 (br. 1850) and Gatsy Bullock, age 25 (br. 1855) with children Lydia, age 4 (br. 1867), Perl, age 2 (br. 1868), and Monroe, age 1 (br. 1869) resided nearby at 207. Up the road at No. 34 was Big John, age 40 (br. 1830) and Ellen Bullock, age 36 (br. 1834), living with Bynum, age 18 (br. 1852), Joseph, age 16 (br. 1854), Jake, age 14 (br. 1856), Angeline, age 11 (br. 1859), James, age 4 (br. 1866), Nicy, age 2 (br. 1868), and William, age 1 (1869).

Next to Big John at No. 33 was Hosea Davis, Jr., the son of plantation owner, Hosea Davis. The other plantation owner, Hubert (Hugh) Bullock was located down the road at No. 199 near Moses, No. 209 and James, the elder, No. 207.

From the spoken folklore of the late Mrs. Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson, the lives of the white extended families of Hugh Bullock and the Black Bullock Family Group of the House of Moses in Lawrence, Marion, Pike and Walthall Countries continued to be entwined and locked in remarkable and extraordinary mutual human bonding, fellowship and respect for over a generation. Remarkably in 1870, the census taker recorded a white child, William Bashmon, age 7, related to Hosea Davis, Jr. residing with Big John and Ellen.

In 1870, Moses and Caroline adopted the surname of Benjamin Youngblood, the plantation that Moses appeared last subjected at. Benjamin Youngblood was born in Georgia, and died sometime around 1850 leaving his wife, Susan, and son, Joseph to carry on. Caroline appears to have been subjected on Hugh’s Plantation.

On June 14, 1880, Moses listed his age at 100, Carey (Caroline) at age 80. What is particularly notable and important about Moses and Caroline are that their ordeals record the first stage of the classic African forced migration to the eastern seaboard of Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Moses recorded in 1880 that he and his parents were born in Virginia during the 1700’s. I suspect that Moses’ roots were closely tied to Hugh’s English ancestors, Richard and Charles Bullock, from Colonial Albermarle Parrish, Surry (Surrey), Virginia.

Caroline’s record reflect that she was born in North Carolina sometime around 1800, and that her parents were born in Virginia. Most likely, Caroline’s roots are in Robeson County, North Carolina. Hugh Bullock was born in Robeson County on September 5, 1805. Hugh’s father, Joel Bullock was born in 1781 in Bladen County, NC. Caroline’s birth represent the second classic migration during the 1780’s and 1790’s that forced thousands of Africans and their descendants from Virginia, and the eastern seaboard into wilderness territories of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee.

Moses, Caroline, and their daughter Julia, born about 1820 in North Carolina, were part of the third classic forced migration during the 1800’s when thousands of Africans, and African descendants were again forced into the territories of Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana in a Herculean task to tame the rivers, clear and cultivate the wilderness.

Sometime after June 1880, both Moses and Caroline passed to the other side. Big John also passed sometime between 1880 and 1890. During his lifetime, James Bullock, the younger, born 1866, the third son of Big John and Ellen was always found near his remarkable uncle. Big John’s other sons, Joseph, Jake, Franklin, William, Richeous, and Lucious also appear to have continued a special close relationship with James, the elder.

In 1910 U.S. Census, James, the elder, was dwelling with Angeline Bullock, age 26 (br. 1884), he referred to her as his “niece”. Angeline appears to have been my grandfather’s, John Bullock, older sister, the daughter of George and Liddie Bullock, which strongly indicate that James, the elder, Big John and also Stephen (br. 1833) Bullock of Lawrence-Lincoln County were in fact, brothers.

In 1929, James, the elder, passed“Other Yonder” to the other side to be with his Lord. On his death certificate, he confirmed for history that “Moses Bullock and Caroline Moses” were the blessed parents of James, the elder, and Big John. We returned to our roots and reunited our spiritual bond with our ancestors, our great-great-great paternal grandparents, to the time of forming this country. The Man Called Moses was my Great-Great-Great Grandfather. We can call upon their names once again.

I have a suspicious that Notorious Jake Bullock had been one of Moses’ favorite grandsons. Jake had been one of the freed Princes of Africa and the House of Moses. I suspect that in his vainess, Jake knew his great roots and reined as if he had some type of dominion over women and the State of Mississippi.

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, I found companionship with a strikingly naturally beautiful, gentle and sensitive sweet honey brown toned young lady. Walking with Genie in public was like leading a parade. Wherever she went, heads would turn, spin around and cars horns would blow. Men would stare and cry out to her.

Genie called herself the “Baddest Bitch in Town.” She was raised in a world surrounded by pimps, prostitutes, crime, violence, drug trafficking and addiction. She wanted to make her mark on the world by being a respected “Female Gangster and Pimp.” I could never convince Genie to see another part of the world. With her god given natural intelligence, charisma and beauty, there wasn’t any hill or mountain that she couldn’t conquer. The constant stress of her hustler’s life and slanted view of the world finally wore me down. I couldn’t keep up with my college studies. I walked away from her.

She never talked about or mentioned her father. Genie was a “Youngblood.” I have no idea why she chose me out of all the young men with fame, pedigree, money, cars and worldly possessions. I had nothing to offer her but love. Now, I often wonder if Genie was also a descendent of the House of Moses and that was what truly united us if only for moments in a brief wrinkle of time in our lives.

 

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The Notorious Jake Bullock, A Man From Another Time and Era

One of the most interesting and fascinating members of the post slavery Bullock Family was “The Notorious Jake Bullock”. Jake was Big John and Ellen’s second known son. Jake was my paternal great grandfather. Jake was what the old folks referred to with a great sense of honor, respect and reverence, “A Slavery Man”.

Jake was born about 1856 into American Slavery  The Other World” on a plantation in the Deep South somewhere near the Chitto Bouge, Mississippi or Pearl River in Marion County, Mississippi. Jake was a remarkable man during an extraordinary time in American History who marked his world with a legendary “notorious” wandering reputation with women.

Above, X, marks the Bouge Chitto and the Cirle marks the spot where the early settles like Joel, Hugh Bullock, Moses and Caroline Bullock-Youngblood first  settled in Marion County. It also marks the spot where Big John, Ellen and Jake were born into a world of human bondage. The river is the Bouge Chitto running into Marion County, Mississippi.

During his lifetime, Jake was known famously asPac-Man”, or “Pac Bullock”. So far, I found that Jake shared his life with at least five different women, fathering over fifteen children primarily established through family folklore, and identifying mostly the males that often carried his surname.

My grandfather, John Bullock’s (br. 1896) mother was Lydia Brister-Bullock (br. 1868). Lydia (Liddie) had been one of Jake’s many wandering interests. At the turn of the 19th Century, Lydia had married one of the infamous Bullock Boys from the slavery era on July 18, 1886, George Bullock, Sr. (br. 1854). According to family folklore, George had been Jake’s 1st cousin.

In 1865, the end of the Civil War and assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, Jake was about 9 years old. The Civil War Era was one of the most dramatic periods in American History. For the entire citizenry of the United States, the war turned the world as they knew it, rightfully so, absolutely upside down with the abolition of the Institution of Slavery.

I can imagine that little Jake experienced quite a lot during this time, which may have had a significant impression and impact on his life. During the war, many of our ancestors had been forced sed into service to aid the Confederate war effort. Little Jake witnessed a great majority of the able-bodied white settlers, plantation owners and their in-laws join Confederate forces to save “The South” and slavery. Both the enslaved and enslavers left the plantations in groves for the warfront easing the tension of bondage and labor. Freedom was in the air.

Big John and Ellen may also have been forced to support the Confederacy or joined the Union war effort in the Great War. Family folklore recall that Big John’s sister in law, Delilah, wife of Stephen Bullock of Lawrence County, Mississippi, born 1832, worked at a Civil War camp somewhere in Lawrence County supporting and aiding Union troops.

Black women would have been extremely important assets to the Confederate or Union forces with their natural folk remedies, mothers’ wit, cooking, sewing and cleaning. The men would have been forced to cook & entertain the troops. They also performed extremely important work in the war effort on both sides on supply lines, building & repairing rails, roads, fortifications, and fording dams and rivers.

During this time, Jake and his siblings may have been left alone fending for themselves, which he may have had time to learn a past time trade. There is folklore that Jake may have been a fiddler, like his cousin, George Bullock. George, most likely then not, was the son of Stephen Bullock.

George was two years older than Jake, and they may have learned to play the fiddle together. It was not unusual for this time for embattled plantation owners to move their people held in bondage, en masse, under guard away to other counties and states from advancing Yankees to thwart them from running to freedom under the Union flag.  Jake and George may have been forced  onto a large common slave camp during the war.

At the time of war, Hubert Bullock’s entire family appeared to be involved in human bondage in Mississippi. Hugh and his in-law, Hosea Davis, had their plantations in Marion County, his brothers Thomas and Lemuel were plantation owners in Pike County, Simeon in Lincoln County, and Quinney in Covington County. Hugh’s father and brother, Joel and William, had plantations in Lawrence County where Stephen and George was found immediately after the abolition of slavery.

In 1823, Hugh’s grandfather, Charles Bullock of Roberson County, North Carolina left Hugh’s brother, Lemuel, by will a negro named “Moses”. It is possible that this is the same “Moses” as “Moses (Bullock) Youngblood“, and that he may have been Stephen’s father by a mixed race, or native American woman.

It is extremely possible for bondage siblings and relatives to be raised and sired on different plantations in Mississippi of  the greater white Bullock Family. Big John, the elder, and Stephen shared the same father or mother. In 1880, Stephen was recorded as a “mulatto”, so it may be more probable that they may have shared the same father.

Our family folklore as recalled by the late Mrs. Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson, John’s Daughter, is that grandmother Liddie’s husband was a fiddler that died in an incident in New Orleans by jumping or thrown from a second story window. I have been unable to find any records of George’s death in New Orleans.

During the time of George’s death, New Orleans was a racially tense city for freedmen after the abolition of slavery. In July 1900, the infamous Robert Charles Race Riots broke out in New Orleans where at least 28 people were slaughtered by white mobs. Robert Charles had been a native son of Pike County, Mississippi. When white police officers tried to unfairly arrest and brutalize him, Charles fought back. He killed seven police officers, and shot 27 people.

According to 1900 U.S. Census, Liddie Bullock was found living in Pike County as a widow. There was Levi (br. 2/1885), Angie (br. 2/1889), Hattie (br. 3/1891) George, Jr. had been born in Pike County in February 1893. It is reasonable to assume that George Sr., the Fiddler, son of Stephen Bullock, died between 1893 and 1895. In 1895, Notorious Jake was in the house. My grandfather John was born by the way of Jake that same year.  In February 1898, Jake also fathered an extraordinary daughter, Josie, with Liddie.   

Above, Josie Bullock, another rare reflection into the past in the image of Lydia Brister-Bullock and Jake Bullock, a man of a long lost era and the missing pages of our family legacy and history..

In 1880, Jake, then age 21, and his brother, Joseph, age 23, had set out on their own in Pike County, Beat 3. Jake married a young “mulatto” woman referred to as “L” in about 1876 who was four (4) years his senior. She may have been related to the Libbey Family. In their immediate area, Jake and Joseph was surrounded by members of the Libbey family.

Jake was living next door to a lady with the Libbey surname. She had two teen-aged children carrying the Bullock surname, which suggests that she may have been a former spouse of one of their relatives.  Jake had three children, son J, (James or Jim) born about February 25, 1875, age 4, daughter R (Rebecca) age 3, born 1876 and daughter F (Fannie), five months old, born 1880. Joseph was a few doors down living with his family, wife M (Mary) born 1860, son C (Charles), born 1875, son J (John or James), daughter N (Nellie), born 1879. After 1880, Joseph and his family is lost.

In 1900, Jake was married to a young lady named Lucinda. According to Jake, age 45, on June 2nd in the 1900 U.S. Census, he had married Lucinda, age 35 (br. 1864) in 1887. In Pike County, Beat 5, Jake was living with two grandchildren, Lucious Stobal (br. 1894) and Florence Crooks (br. 1899). Lucinda listed her occupation as a wash woman, while Jake listed his line of work as a “Gardener.”  A “gardener” in rural south instead of a sharecropper farmer hand, Jake was indeed extraordinarily vain,

Sometime after June 1900, a great future family history confusion developed surrounding my great-grandmother Liddie. She married another one of the Bullock Boys, Jim (James Bullock). It wasn’t James, the younger, Jake’s younger brother (br. 1866). This James married a Teala Fisher on January 3, 1884. It was stable marriage. This Bullock Boy happened to be Jake’s son, James (br. 1875), from his prior marriage of 1876 to “L”.

Liddie’s husband, Jim Bullock, wasn’t at all like his father. From family folklore, Jim was a rock and pillar. He was extremely strong, stable, reliable and a hard working man that sincerely cared for Liddie and the kids that included my beloved grandfather, John Bullock. From the Liddie-Jim Bullock union, there was Corine (br. 1901), Beulah (br. 1902) and Julius Monroe (br. 1907).

Mrs. Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson (br. July 13, 1923) remembered last seeing Grandmother Liddie as a little girl just before leaving Mississippi for Louisiana in the 1930s. Onetha last remembered Grandmother Liddie as an extremely large woman sitting on the porch of an old shotgun shack enjoying smoking a corn cob pipe. Reportedly, Jim often said that Liddie made the best biscuits in Mississippi.  

According to the 1920 U.S. Census, the Remarkable Jake Bullock was last heard of in Pike County, Beat 3, at the age of 63 with wife, Manda (br. 1867) living with an adopted son, Robert Allen, age 7. I couldn’t locate any record of his death.

My grandfather was rather puzzled by Pac Bullock” most likely to the day of death. Mrs. Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson, often asked about him about his father, but John had always been reluctant to acknowledge, discuss, or share anything about Jake. However, John did name his third son, J.T. Bullock, after his father that we called famously, the Late Great Jake Bullock”.

Jake’s other estanged son, Sam Bullock, also must have rather been preplexed with Jake. Apparently, Jake also had little or anything to do with his upbringing.  Sam adopted Quinn as his surame after his mother, Zedda Quinn.

Nevertheless Jake’s most dubious reputation, history has proven him to have been exceedingly bold, strong, resilient, and an extraordinary man from one of the most troubled, violent and extraordinary periods of this country’s history. Jake was also very, very vain, but GOD ALMIGHTY, I wish I knew more about these most remarkable and extraordinary “Mules of Men and Women” of my family legacy.

 

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The Bullock Chronicles’ Family Legacy Website & The Saga of Big John and Ellen Bullock

The Bullock Family Legacy Chronicles is a special collection of family roots, notes, and the Manchild life experiences of native son Princeray. The Family Legacy Notes explore a Black family’s struggle from Africa, the Middle Passage, and Human Bondage to Conditional Freedom in America. Human bondage was an especially painful and terrifying spiritual chapter in the family’s psyche, an elder described the ancestors of human bondage as to have lived in a chillingly propound sacred state of disassociation in “The Other World”.

We would not be here to celebrate life without the magnificence of their strength and spirit during this harrowing period in history. The ancestors flourished under the most extraordinary inhumane and periling circumstances in human history. They endured separation & isolation, murder, rape, wars, fathom, terrorism, and disease to spread their seeds of destiny. There has never been a national conscience or interest to reunite, reconstruct, or pay reparations to Black families destroyed and torn apart by the savagery of American Human Bondage.

Very little governmental resources, if any at all, have been committed to aid Black families in their quest to reunite and reconstruct the spiritual links to their African and American past. It remains a heroic task of the dying traditional family historians/genealogist. American Black Genealogy has been practically ignored and disregarded as an art of its own sufficient uniqueness to certify its own genealogist. As a science and art form, due to the ravages of Human Bondage and destruction of Black family groups, Black Genealogy has to play a duel role in reuniting, and reconstructing our spiritual and ancestral lineages and past primarily through the bold interpretation of family folklore, records, censuses and public records, if any. The Black Genealogist, whether self appointed or not, trained or certified must begin the record our roots and folklore for future generations.

This site is dedicated to our ancestors. It is a testament of sacrifice, genius, strength, heroism, hope, and spiritual faith. This site is also and especially dedicated to my late father, Rayford Bullock, who suffered quietly in agony & humiliation. His story is testament of a monumental and classic human betrayal, and breach of faith at the hands of his beloved country. This site is also dedicated to my uncle Julius Bullock that inspired me at every moment to keep the flame burning to unite our family and my dearly departed brother, Anthony Bullock, which commanded that I bring color and life to my ancestors and call forth their names into the 21st Century.

The Saga of Big John and Ellen Bullock

Because of Slavery, most Black families lack sufficient folklore or records to work from in family roots genealogical research. It is extremely important to our research to identify, locate and record the immediate ancestral post-antebellum origins of our pre Civil War freedmen ancestors. We primarily work from census records and family folklore to determine, identify, track the roots of our families, and reunite long lost immediate and extended family members of freedmen.  At the abolition of slavery, we can find some freedmen remaining at the site of bondage as tenant-farmers living with her immediate family alongside in-laws and former enslavers. However in many cases, freedmen were justified  and often sometimes forced to leave their places of bondage and servitude without a trace.

John & Ellen Bullock, the grand elders of the nuclear post slavery Bullock Family, were my great-great grandparents. They were born into, and survived “THE OTHER WORLD”, American’s Peculiar Institution of Slavery. In 1870, we are fortunate to find John, forty (40) years old, born around 1829-1830, Ellen, thirty-six (36), born around 1834-35) in Marion County, Mississippi raising a family. John & Ellen had to have been  strong, and remarkably resourceful  individuals to keep most of their slavery era family intact. They not only survived the savagery of slavery, they conquered the wind, rain, cold and disease that  ravaged our ancestors during this classical historical period. I call John, “BIG JOHN.”

In 1860, the slave schedules show a thirty (30) year old male living which is believed to be Big John subjected on a farm in Marion County, Mississippi, belonging to wealthy plantation owner, Hugh (Hubert) Bullock. The slave schedules did not list the names, first or last, for our ancestors. It just listed the age and gender.

There is further and more convincing evidence suggesting that John had been subjected to bondage on the plantation of Hugh Bullock. In 1880, Big John Bullock was living next door to Jesse Leonard Bullock. Jesse, age 36, was the youngest son of Hugh Bullock.

Consider this further evidence that Big John Bullock was in fact associated to Hugh Bullock. In 1870, Big John Bullock was found living next door to plantation owner,  Hosea (Hosey) Davis (Davies), age seventy (70). Hosea was a wealthy and respected early pioneer of Marion/Pike County. Hosea was a close relative of Rhoda Davis Bullock, mother of Hugh Bullock. Hosea must have passed between 1870-1880, because in 1880 Jesse Leonard is living at Hosea’s farm. Jesse Leonard must have inherited the farm as a surviving grandson of Hosea.

From around 1818 thru 1826, Joel Bullock, Hugh’s father, Rhoda and Hosea, Sr. emigrated from North Carolina to the wildiness of Mississippi. They along with Luke Conerly, Newton Cowart, Stephen and John Regan founded an early settlement around Waterholes Church, just outside the line formed by the creation of Pike County.

Ellen and Big John Bullock had to have been trusted, respected, and essential links to the Bullock and Davis families. Little is known of Ellen, John’s thirty-six (36) year old wife. Hugh Bullock’s 1860 slave schedules did not record a twenty-six (26) female on the plantation, so we may assume she and the kids were in bondage at an adjacent plantation, possibly the Ranklin Plantation.

In 1870, Hosea Davis, Jr. was found living next door to his father, and Big John and Ellen. At home appearing to be living with Ellen and John was a white child, seven (7) year old William Bashmon. William was believed associated with Hosea, Sr., possibly a grandson. The census taker would usually take the liberty to place a white child with his or her relatives nevertheless found in the home of freedmen.  In the opinion of an experienced Black genealogist, she found this situation most usual and extraordinary for its time and place to have a white child living in open with former freedmen. It suggested that John and Ellen were in fact people of “high responsibility.”

In 1870, Big John & Ellen was living with slavery era children Bynum, age 18, born 1852, Joseph, age 16, born 1854, and Jake, age 14, born 1856, Angeline, age 14, born 1859, and post-slavery children James, age 4, born 1866, and Nisa, age 2, born 1868. For reasons exactly not fully understood at this time, the nuclear post slavery Bullock Family tended to name children after immediate relatives, which cause some confusion. For example, John’s son, James, born, 1866, I initially misidentified him as the husband of my great grandmother, Liddie (Lydia) Brister/Bullock, when in fact it was Big John’s grandson, James (Jim) Bullock, born 1876, that was married to Liddle. There was yet another James Bullock. This James, the Elder,  had been the brother of Big John Bullock.

In 1870, James Bullock, the elder, was found living next door to Hugh Bullock. James was listed at 38, with his wife Gatsy, age 32, Lidie Ann, age 16, Pearl, age 11, Burrell, above, age 9, Caroline, age 6, Emile, age 2, and Angus, below, age 11 months. Also next door to James was Judy Youngblood, age 55 (born 1815), Moses, age 85 (born 1765), and Crary (Caroline) Youngblood, age 60 (born 1810). Judy appeared to have two slavery era sons, James, age 18 (born 1852) and Berry, age 16 (born 1854). Also listed as living with the family were slavery era freedmen Julie, age 30 (born 1840), Clovina, age 23 (born 1857), Jane, age 25 (born 1855), Lacey, age 10 (born 1860), Rose, age 11 (born 1859), and post slavery Monroe, age 2 (born 1868).

The families, and descendants of  the elders James Bullock (born 1840), and Big John had traditionally shared and maintained such close ties which suggest that they were brothers. In fact, both James and BigJohn had been closely associated with  Hugh Bullock. John and James appear to have been trusted, essential and important associates of Hugh and his extended family.

In 1929, James, the elder’s mother and father was recorded to have been Moses Bullock and Caroline Moses identified by census records as Moses and Caroline Youngblood. In 1880, Moses and Caroline were found near both James and Big John. Moses listed age was 100, Caroline was 80 years old. Close to Moses and Caroline were slavery era freedmen Amos Youngblood, age 52, Judy 55, and Jake Youngblood, age 30. All of them including the elders Big John and James appeared to be working as farm hands or sharecroppers on the plantation of Hugh Bullock. After the abolition of slavery, freedmen were free to select surnames. Some, if not most chose the last enslaver’s surname. Moses chose Youngblood. James and Big John chose Bullock.

The Bullock and Youngblood plantations were contiguous. By the 1850 slave schedule, Ben Youngblood had subjected a Black male, age 65, probably and most likely Moses. Hugh Bullock subjected a Black female, age 50, most probably Caroline. It was not unlikely or unusual for pre Civil War/Abolition married couples and their children to live on different plantations.

What is important about Moses and Caroline are that their ordeals record the first stage of classic African forced immigration to the eastern seaboard of Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Moses recorded in 1880 that he and his parents were born in Virginia in the 1700’s.

Caroline record that she was born in North Carolina sometime around 1800, and her parents were born in Virginia. Her birth in North Carolina represent the second classic migration during the 1780-90’s that forced thousands of Africans and their descendants from Virginia, and the eastern seaboard into uncultivated and virgin wildiness areas of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee.

Moses, Caroline, and Julia, sister of Caroline or daughter of Moses, born about 1820 in North Carolina, were part of the third classic forced migration during the 1800’s when again thousands of African and their descendants were forced into Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana to clear and cultivate the land  to make COTTON KING.

Elders Big John and James also appeared to have been related to Jack Bullock (born 1832). In 1880, Jack stated that he was married, but was not listed with wife on the census. Jack was living with his son and wife, Bynum (born 1852), Jane (born 1855). Their children were Nora, age 7  (born 1873-74), Angie (Angeline), age 5 (born 1875), and Lucinda, age 4 months (born 1880).Big John, James and Jack were the some of the backbone that tamed the rivers, hills and wildiness of virgin Mississippi.

In 1870, Bynum was living with Big John as his oldest son. Additionally,  James, the elder, and (Jim) James,Big John’s son hereinafter referred to as Jim, the younger, were always close. Jim, the younger, was the third son of Big John, born 1866.

In 1870, Ellen’s race was recorded as Black, but the legend that their son Jake had long black hair like an Indian suggest that Ellen more likely than Big John may have been in fact Native American mixed. Jake was a legendary notorious rich dark chocolate “Ladies Man” that may have resembled something like out of Sidney Poitier’s Hollywood movie, “The Long Ships.”  

By 1880, Big John’s  sons, Joseph and Jake, moved on to raise their own families in Pike County. Ellen must have passed sometime between 1870 and 1880, because in 1880, Big John was found married and living with Mary Davis, age 40, born 1840 in Mississippi. Mary most likely had been related to the Hosea Davis and his plantation.

Big John passed sometime between 1890-1900 leaving sons, Joseph, Jake, James, Franklin, William (Will), Richeous, and Lucious. Folklore around Walthall County referred to them as the somewhat infamous and notorious,” Bullock Boys.” At one time, the Infamous Bullock Boys may have populated half of the Black population of Walthall, Pike and Marion Counties. Of course, I can’t confirm that.

In 1910, James, the Elder, was dwelling with his niece, Angeline Bullock, age 26 (born 1884-85). Recall, the same children names reoccurs over and over again in the post bondage nuclear Bullock Family, which also give us important clues. This Angeline appears to have been Jake’s daughter, which confirm that James and Big John, the Elders were in fact brothers. Angeline, John’s daughter, born 1859, and her descendents, and Byrum Bullocks daughter Angeline, born 1875, after 1880 remain lost.

Gwendolyn McGowan (The McGowen Family) has excellent resources and pictures for two of  James, the elder’s sons that married into the McGowan family in Walthall County, Mississippi. In fact, my grandfather, John Bullock (br. 1895) Ida McGowen (br. 1898) and another estranged son of the Notorious Jake Bullock below.

Sam Bullock-Quinn (br. 1893), also married (Ethel McGowen, br. 1896) Ida’s sister, from one of the McGowan-McGowen Families of Walthall County.

Email me for questions, suggestions, resources and references! rayfordbullock@yahoo.com

 

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The Saga of Big John & Ellen Bullock, The Elders

One day, my late brother Peaches (Anthony Bullock) approached me with a single folded piece of white paper. He was excited. He told me that he had just talked to our maternal grandmother, Jerine Hutchinson-Blueford, about the family legacy. On the paper he had noted some names and brief histories from my grandmother’s  lineage birthplace in Louisiana. I told him that’s fantastic and it was very important information for our family to have. I encouraged him to keep developing our family legacies and turned to walk away. He stopped me. He said, “Ray, this is your job not mine. You have been educated to do this work.”

I briefly if only for a moment reflected about what he had said. I had an A.B. degree in Anthropology. I traveled and studied cultures across the country and a country on the other side of midnight. I give color and make cultures come alive, but I had failed to look at my own family to give them color and make our own family legacies and histories come alive. I took that piece of paper from my brother. I told him. Peaches, you’re right. This is my job. This was my beginning in the search to bring color and life to an Extraordinary and Heroic Black Family Legacy and History.

SLAVERY, The “OTHER WORLD”

My grandmother called the institution of slavery, living in the “OTHER WORLD.” To our ancestors, slavery was like living in another dimension. I found this descriptions of slavery most profound. Among our people, those that had survived this most profound and ugly other worldiness and dimension and the great Civil War were other dimensional Heroic.

Coloring and Giving Life to the Heroes of Our Family Legacy

Because of institutional racism and slavery, most Black families lack sufficient folklore and official records to work from in family roots genealogical research. At the abolition of slavery, most of our ancestors were abandoned and lost to the wind, rain, cold and disease with only the rags on their backs.

It is extremely important to our research to identify, locate and record the immediate ancestral post-antebellum origins to give color and life to our pre and post Civil War freedmen ancestors. We have to work mostly from census records to determine, identify, track the roots of our families, and reunite long lost immediate and extended family members of freedmen.  At the abolition of slavery, we can find some freedmen remaining at the site of bondage as tenant-farmers living alongside their immediate family and in-laws; and former enslavers. However in many cases, freedmen were justified  and often forced to leave their places of bondage and servitude without leaving a trace.

The Heroic Elders of the Bondage

John & Ellen Bullock, above, the grand elders of the nuclear post slavery Bullock Family were my great-great grandparents. They were born into and survived “THE OTHER WORLD”, America’s Ugly Institution of Slavery. In 1870, we are fortunate to find John, forty (40) years old, born around 1829-1830, Ellen, thirty-six (36), born around 1834-35) in Marion County, Mississippi raising a family. John & Ellen had to have been big, strong, and remarkably resourceful  individuals to keep most of their slavery era family intact. They not only survived the savagery of slavery. They conquered the wind, rain, cold and diseases that  ravaged our ancestors during this historical period.

In 1860, the slave schedules show a thirty (30) year old male living which is believed to be John subjected on a farm in Marion County, Mississippi, belonging to wealthy plantation owner, Hugh (Hubert) Bullock. The slave schedules did not list the names, first or last, for our ancestors. It just listed the age and gender.

There is further and more convincing evidence suggesting that John had been subjected to bondage on the plantation of Hugh Bullock. In 1880, John Bullock, the elder, was living next door to Jesse Leonard Bullock. Jesse, age 36, was the youngest son of Hugh Bullock.

Consider this further evidence that John Bullock was in fact associated to Hugh Bullock. In 1870, John Bullock was found living next door to plantation owner,  Hosea (Hosey) Davis (Davies), age seventy (70). Hosea was a wealthy and respected early pioneer of Marion/Pike County. Hosea was a close relative of Rhoda Davis Bullock, mother of Hugh Bullock. Hosea must have passed between 1870-1880, because in 1880 Jesse Leonard is living at Hosea’s farm. Jesse Leonard must have inherited the farm as a surviving grandson of Hosea.

From around 1818 thru 1826, Joel Bullock, father of Hugh, Rhoda and Hosea, Sr. emigrated from North Carolina to Mississippi. They along with Luke Conerly, Newton Cowart, Stephen and John Regan founded an early settlement around Waterholes Church, just outside the line formed by the creation of Pike County.

Ellen and John Bullock had to have been trusted, respected, and essential links to the Bullock and Davis families. Little is known of Ellen, John’s thirty-six (36) year old wife. Hugh Bullock’s 1860 slave schedules did not record a twenty-six (26) female on the plantation, so we may assume she and the kids were in bondage at an adjacent plantation, possibly the Ranklin Plantation.  In 1870, Hosea Davis, Jr. was found living next door to his father, John and Ellen. At home appearing to be living with Ellen and John was a white child, seven (7) year old William Bashmon. William was associated with Hosea, Sr., possibly a grandson. The census taker would usually take the liberty to place the white child with his or her relatives nevertheless found in the home of freedmen.  In the opinion of an experienced Black genealogist, she found this situation most usual and extraordinary for its time and place to have a white child living in open with former freedmen. It suggested that John and Ellen were in fact people of “high responsibility.”

In 1870, John & Ellen was living with slavery era children Bynum, age 18, born 1852, Joseph, age 16, born 1854, my great-grandfather Jake, age 14, born 1856, Angeline, age 14, born 1859, and post-slavery children James, age 4, born 1866, and Nisa, age 2, born 1868. For reasons exactly not fully understood at this time, the nuclear post slavery Bullock Family tended to name children after immediate relatives, which cause some confusion. For example, John’s son, James, born, 1866, I initially misidentified him as the husband of my great- grandmother, Liddie Brister/Bullock, when in fact it was Jake’s son, James Bullock, born 1876, that was married to Liddle. There was yet another James Bullock. This James, the Elder,  had been the brother of  John Bullock, the Elder.

By 1880, Joseph and Jake moved on to raise their own families in Pike County. Ellen must have passed sometime between 1870 and 1880, because in 1880, John was found married and living with Mary Davis, age 40, born 1840 in Mississippi. Mary most likely had been related to the Hosea Davis and his plantation. In 1870, Ellen’s race was recorded as Black, but the legend that their son Jake had long black hair like an Indian suggest that Ellen or John may have been in fact  mixed.

In 1870, James Bullock, the elder, was found living next door to Hugh Bullock. James was listed at 38, with his wife Gatsy, age 32, Lidie Ann, age 16, Pearl, age 11, Burrell, pictured above, age 9, Caroline, age 6, Emile, age 2, and Angus, picutered below, age 11 months. Also next door to James was Judy Youngblood, age 55 (born 1815), Moses, age 85 (born 1765), and Crary (Caroline) Youngblood, age 60 (born 1810). Judy appeared to have two slavery era sons, James, age 18 (born 1852) and Berry, age 16 (born 1854). Also listed as living with the family were slavery era freedmen Julie, age 30 (born 1840), Clovina, age 23 (born 1857), Jane, age 25 (born 1855), Lacey, age 10 (born 1860), Rose, age 11 (born 1859), and post slavery Monroe, age 2 (born 1868).

The families, and descendants of  the elders James Bullock (born 1840), and John had traditionally shared and maintained such close ties which suggest that they were brothers. In fact, both James and John were closely associated with  Hugh Bullock. Both John and James appear to have been trusted, essential and important associates of Hugh and his extended family.

In 1929, James’ mother and father was recorded to have been Moses Bullock and Caroline Moses identified by census records as Moses and Caroline Youngblood. In 1880, Moses and Caroline were found near both James and John. Moses listed age was 100, Caroline was now 80 years old. Close to Moses and Caroline were slavery era freedmen Amos Youngblood, age 52, Judy now 55, and Jake Youngblood, age 30. All of them including the elders John and James appeared to be working as farm hands or sharecroppers on the plantation of Hugh Bullock. After the abolition of slavery, freedmen were free to select surnames. Some, if not most chose the last enslaver’s surname. Moses chose Youngblood. James and John chose Bullock.

The Bullock and Youngblood plantations were contiguous. By the 1850 slave schedule, Ben Youngblood had subjected a Black male, age 65, probably and most likely Moses. Hugh Bullock subjected a Black female, age 50, most probably Caroline. It was not unlikely or unusual for pre Civil War/Abolition married couples and their children to live on different plantations.

What is important about Moses and Caroline are that their ordeals record the first stage of classic African forced immigration to the eastern seaboard of Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Moses recorded in 1880 that he and his parents were born in Virginia in the 1700’s.

Caroline record that she was born in North Carolina sometime around 1800, and her parents were born in Virginia. Her birth in North Carolina represent the second classic migration during the 1780-90’s that forced thousands of Africans and their descendants from Virginia, and the eastern seaboard into uncultivated and virgin areas of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee.

Moses, Caroline, and Julia, sister of Carolina or daughter of Moses, born about 1820 in North Carolina, were part of the third classic forced migration during the 1800’s when again thousands of African and their descendants were forced into Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana to clear and cultivate the land.

Elders John and James also appeared to have been related to Jack Bullock (born 1832). In 1880, Jack stated that he was married, but was not listed with wife on the census. Jack was living with his son and wife, Bynum (born 1852), Jane (born 1855). Their children were Nora, age 7  (born 1873-74), Angie (Angeline), age 5 (born 1875), and Lucinda, age 4 months (born 1880).

In 1870, Bynum was living with John ,the elder, as his oldest son. Additionally,  James, the elder, and (Jim) James, hereinafter referred to as Jim, the younger, were always close. Jim, the younger, was the third or second son of John Bullock, born 1866. John, the elder, passed sometime between 1890-1900 leaving sons, Joseph, Jake, Jim, the younger, Franklin, William, Richeous, and Lucious.

In 1910, James, the elder, was dwelling with his niece, Angeline Bullock, age 26 (born 1884-85). Recall, the same children names reoccurs over and over again in the Bullock Family, which also give us important clues. Angeline appears to have been my great grandfather Jake’s daughter, which confirm that James and John, the elders were in fact related, most likely brothers. Angeline, John the elder’s daugher (born 1859), after 1880 is still lost at this time.

Gwendoly McGowan, Digging for McGowan Family Roots, has excellent resources, backgrounds and pictures for two of  James the elder’s sons that married into the McGowan family in Walthall County, Mississippi. Additionally, my grandfather, John Bullock, also married into the McGowen-McGowan (Ida) family in Wathall County.

Questions or resource information. Email me!

 

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