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Out of the Other World, Notorious Jake Bullock: Man, Myth & Spirit

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And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of of life; and man became a living soul. The Original African Heritage Study Bible (King James Version) 1998

Above all, Notorious Jake Bullock was an important historical figure worthily of study. Born in the brutal ungodly Deep South in 1856, Jake was a slavery man. In the world of inhuman bondage, he had lived a slave stripped and raped of all humanity, dignity and compassion. In bondage, Jake had experienced and seen unspeakable “unworldly” and “unearthly” horror, death, evil, pain, suffering and misery.Yet, there existed something remarkable and mysterious about Jake.

He (Jake) had long dark hair like an Indian. –Sam Bullock (1893-1970)

It is interesting that one of his sons, Sam Bullock-Quinn, described Jake distinctly and stunningly like a Black Indian. It is suggestively of Native American influence. Before Columbus and European settlements in America, there were Black Native Americans with straight black hair.

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Above, two Black Pre-Columbus California Native Americans.

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Above, Post-Columbus Black complexioned Native American with long dark straight hair.

My impression from the little oral folklore about Jake is that he seemed more of a mythical figure than real. I mean it seems as if Sam and Big Papa John Bullock only observed Jake from a distance in passing. Big Papa was a big 6’2”-6’4” man for any man to reckon with. My father, Rayford, Big Papa’s eldest son passed down folklore to his eldest daughter, Erma (Clemon Teen) Lee Bullock, that Big Papa was a leading figure in some type of Council of Black Elders that unofficially resided over Black people affairs with whites in Walthall-Pike and Marion Counties.

Before the turn of the century, there was a recorded improper indiscretion between a member of their community, Dick Tyler, with some white women in Pike County. A former bondsman, Dick Tyler, was a well respected mountain of a man. He was a legendary strong man lumberjack of the forest like a mythical Black Paul Bunyon. It wasn’t whites that ran Tyler out of the county. It was this Council of Black Elders that gave him a good trashing before booting him of town.

I said this to say that from oral family folklore passed down by my father, Big Papa was a well respected leading figure in Walthall County. Even Big Papa appeared mystified with Jake. He refused to talk about him even among his own children.

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Above,19th century contemporary Ethiopians, Yohmamnes IV (1831-1889) and Tewodros II (1818-1863), with long dark straight hair like Native Americans.

Jake’s dark complexion and long dark hair may also suggest a strong Eastern African influence as above. We have only a very few clues of the African influences of the root Black Bullock family groups of Marion County, Mississippi, whom may have not been a generation removed from their African roots. One important clue comes from naming rituals and customs. Jake’s younger sister, born 1865 at the end of the Great Civil War, was named “Nisa.”

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Above, a beautiful Hausa woman from the Motherland. Nisa was an unusual name for John and Ellen Bullock, because they had often named their children from very close relatives.or the enslavers’ families. However, Nisa (Nissa) is distinctly African (Hausa) meaning anything- groaned, thought about dead or absent person; distance.

Sam’s mother name, Zada, is also distinctly African (Hausa) meaning “derived from Arabic”, f. exaggeration, then Zado (Hausa) means “Katsina House” tall and handsome person. That’s really interesting because Zada thought that she was too fine, bright and handsome of a woman to have a dark and beautiful off spring like Sam and may have left him to others to raise.

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In Nana Banchie Darkwah, Ph.D. reflective landmark book THE AFRICANS WHO WROTE THE BIBLE, it show clearly a linguistically and DNA link with ancient Kemet (Egypt) and Cush (Nubia-Ethiopia) to descendants of Sub Saharan Africa notably the Akan- Hausa people of Ghana, Guinea and Nigeria. The Late Great Senegalese Historian and Anthropologist Cheikh Anta Diop traces Ancient Kemet and Cush-Nubians descendants to geographical Africa.Diop used linguistics, archeological artifacts, culture, and documentary text to prove his research.

The Hebrew ‘rison adam’ = ancestral man is ‘adamu orisa’ = ancestral Adam in Hahm/Hausa languages of Nigeria. The Hausa word for human being is ‘dan adam.’ The Sanskrit word for male human is ‘manu’ which resembles the African word ‘adamu’ more closely than the Hebrew word.

The implications could be equally but more profound if Jake was a descendent of the mysterious Kemites, Ethiopians or Cushites of the Bible. We do know that in 1870 there was also something most unusual and extraordinary about his father and mother, Big John and Ellen.

“And he that keeepth his commandments dwelleth in him, and he in him. And hereby we know that he abideth in us, by the Spirit which he hath given us.” 1John 3:24 , The Original African Heritage Study Bible (King James Version) 1998

In 1870, the U.S. Census taker recorded that a 7 (seven) year old white child, W.H. Bashon, residing with Big John, Ellen, Jake and his brothers and sisters. I asked an eminent African American genealogist about this oddity that didn’t seem to happen if ever. I was informed that usually even if a white child was found with a Black family that the census taker, most often a local, would never record the child with the Black family but always list him or her with their proper white residential family.

The Bashon child had been related to the household of a wealthy white plantation owner, Hosea Davis. Hosea along with his son-in-law, Hugh Bullock, were well respected pioneers, influential and leading citizens of Marion County, Mississippi.

The genealogist suddenly looked away with a far away look in her eyes, she told me that this indicates that Big John and Ellen maintained an unusual and extraordinary position of “High Esteem” in the community. Were John and Ellen shamans or African religious faith healers?

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Like above, my impression is that Jake most likely rode through Marion-Pike-Walthall Counties similar to a mounted Hausa Warrior from the Motherland. I tell you that Jake was no ordinary man, somebody, whether Native American or African, taught Jake special things, and how to escape the numbing of Slavery by transformations, entering Spirit Worlds.

The OTHER WORLD, American Slavery

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“…for as the days of a tree are the days of my people, and mine elect shall long enjoy the work of their hands. They shall not labour in vain, nor bring forth for trouble; for they are the seed of the blessed of the LORD, and their offspring with them.” Isaiah 65:21-22, The Original African Heritage Study Bible (King James Version) 1998

Our ancestors profoundly said that the survivors of American bondage lived in the “Other World.” To the generation that followed them, they were heroic figures. To survive the sheer brutality and cruelty of slavery, the ancestors existed in two worlds, part spirit,-part real.

Jake had lived through Slavery, the Great Civil War, the Assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, Reconstruction and the First World War. It didn’t make him dysfunctional, spiteful, mean and evil. I am pretty sure that if he was pure evil that someone would have killed him.

I tell you that Jake Bullock was not only a heroic figure from the “Other World.” He was part man-part spirit. There was something strange and supernatural about Jake. My impression is that Jake was incredibly passionate, yet not romantic in any sense of the word. He had to have been spellbinding, magnetic and deeply hypnotic to do the things he did.

Around Pike, Marion and Walthall County, Mississippi, Jake had earned the repute of “Pac Man Bullock.” As far as I know, Jake was the only man with that particular distinction. At the turn of the century, “pac or pack” was usually slang that referenced dominate masculine sexual interaction (sex) with women.

Now, pack (packing) is associated with the Phallus. Interestingly, the phallus, model of the male genital organ, the symbol of fertility was carried in procession in many ancient religious ceremonies in order to stimulate the fruitfulness of the earth, the flocks, and the people, and so prevent weakness of the race. One of the most popular ancient cults of the PHALLLUS was in worship of the God OSIRIS of Kemet.

From the Ice Age to the Ancient Land of Kemet, the Phallus has been a mysterious religious symbol. It is an universal Sacred Symbol of Male Creative Power which is still a symbol of mysterious cult worship today. I tell you that in order to record all the off springs of Jake- I need to explore new and different family trees and software

Yet, we still really know every little about Jake. Jake was a mystery. Even my grandfather, John Bullock, refused to talk or discuss anything to anyone about his father. Big Papa John Bullock just didn’t appear to be a man to sly again from any subject or any other man. Yet, there was something about Jake that he couldn’t talk about. Papa named his second son, J.T., but we called him, Jake. At that time and for decades, we really knew nothing about his legendary father, the Notorious Jake Bullock.

At the abolition of slavery, his sons including Big Papa and most of Jake’s relatives continued to maintain noticeable kinship with their former enslavers and related families. After the war, many entered into new post-slavery sharecropping contracts with the former slave owning anti-bellum landowners that lasted for decades from one generation to another. That is, mostly all, except Jake. My impression is that even white folks that knew him from childhood didn’t really talk about Jake either.

In 1900, the U.S. Census asked Jake’s profession. Jake said that his avocation was a “gardener,” a person that works in or tends a garden. My impression is that Jake didn’t have much of a sense of humor, or be sarcastic. In 1900, Pike, Marion and Walthall Counties were predominately agrarian communities. Most people were farmers, sharecroppers or worked at the saw mills.

Jake was strangely shrew and philosophical for a man of his time and education. Jake was talking about a “human” garden. Jake meant what he said, gardener- to stimulate the fruitfulness of the earth, the flocks, and the people, and so prevent weakness of the race.

Papa’s mother, Liddie (Lydia) Brister-Bullock, had to have been spellbound with Jake. In about 1886, she married Jake’s first cousin, George Bullock (b. 1854 or1861). A number of different sources confirmed that George was related to Jake’s anti-bellum family. George may have been the elder son of Stephen (1833) and Delila Bullock (1841) of Lincoln County. At this time, it can’t be determined if Stephen had been Jake’s uncle or Delila an aunt. In 1880, Stephen had been described as a mulatto. But from consistent family folklore, Jake and George were 1st cousins.

There may have been yet another possible George Bullock (br. 1860). This George was the son of Pricey Sibley (1835). Pricey had a second son, probably William (b. 1864) through Big John Bullock during bondage. I suspected that Big John may have been a forced classical African breeding stud. After abolition of slavery, Big John seemed to have taken particular interest and care of his off springs.

Liddie had one child of the marriage, George, Jr. (b. June 6, 1894-1920). George, Sr. passed sometime between the conception and birth of George, Jr. and 1900 when Lydia reported that she was a widow. I suspect that Jake’s beloved cousin had passed sometime between October 1893 and March 1895 when Papa was conceded.

My impression is George, Sr. and Jake had been very close in life and spirit. Both had been born in the “Other World,” human bondage, and survived. Family folklore suggests that they both had been entertainers, fiddlers. The Late Great Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson told me that she had narrowed down from the family that George, Sr. was killed in New Orleans by either jumping from a window or being thrown out of it.

Jake had an older brother born into bondage, Joseph Bullock (b. 1854-1900?). Jake also had been spiritually bonded with Joseph. In 1880, Joseph was married to Mary Ann Bullock (1860) just a couple of houses from Jake and his wife, Lucinda (1856-1910?). In 1880, Joseph’s children were Charley (b. 1875), John or Joseph, Jr. (b. 1876), Nannie-Nancy (b. 1879) and Willie (b. 1880). After the death of Joseph and George, I don’t think Jake shared very much of himself with any other males not even his many sons.

After the U.S. 1900 Census, Liddie married James (Jim) Bullock with the birth of Corine Bullock in March 1901. Jim was Jake’s elder son through Lucinda. In 1880, the Jake and Lucinda’s marriage had produced Jim (2/1875) above, Rebecca (1877), Francis Bullock (1878) and another William (1881).

Before Lucinda, Jake had reportedly had a son, Longeno (b. 1873). Between Francis and William, Jake had a union with Liddie’s mother that produced a son (Dudley) in 1880. In that same year, Jake had a union with Julia that produced another son, Eugene, in 1881; and Jake had yet another son named Bud Bullock (br. March/April 1881). Strangely, it seems as if Jake could be in several different places at the same time.

In 1885, Liddie and Jake may have had Levi (2/1885), George and Liddie had Angeline (9/1887) and most likely Hattie (3/1891), then Liddie and Jake had Papa (1895) after George’s death, and Josie 2/1898). Between Hattie and Papa, Jake had a union with Zady (Zada) Thompson (b. 5/1877) that produced another son, Sam (b. 1893).

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Incredibly in 1900, Zada and her sister, Izel (10/1876), were living with Jake and Lucendia seven (7) years after the birth of Sam. Izel is also an mystical and ancient Mayan name, The meaning of the name is moon goddess, she of the rainbow. An original form of Itzel is Ix Chel (Mayan). The first name is derived from the name of the Mayan moon goddess, Ix Chel.

Above, Ix Chel with a remarkably similar serpent (wisdom) headdress of her much older Egyptian prototype Moon Goddess, Isis. In Kemet Mythology, Isis is sister-wife of Osiris, and the mother of Horus. Recall, Osiris is one of the most established ancient PHALLUS procession Gods.

According to Mayan mythology, the moon goddess Ix Chel, together with her sun god husband, created the pantheon of Mayan gods. Known also as the Lady Rainbow, she is connected to the tides, water, and rain flow.

Ix Chel presumably presides over Manataka, once a mystical gathering place of peace for spiritual elders and indigenous tribal leaders. She is a powerful healer with creational roots and can be invoked to help tap into into the infinite source of divine healing energy that flows through all of life.

Was there something extremely unusual about Zada, Izel and Jake’s relationships? I suspect that there was indeed. Was Jake some type of teacher? I suspect that he was! Teaching what, I don’t know. After 1900, we simply lose track of Zada and Izel.

In 1900, Jake’s wife, Lucendia, reportedly was 36 years old, born 7/1864. It certainly wasn’t Jake’s 1880 wife, Lucinda (Huey?) b. 1856. According to Jake and Lucendia, they had married some time in 1887. Jake had two grandsons living with him, Lucius Stovall (8/1894) and Florence Crooks (1/1899). Lucius appeared to be the son of his daughter Rebecca (br. 1877) that had been recently widowed.

After Papa John’s birth, Jake had yet another son named after his late uncle, Jack Bullock (b. 1896). We can trace some of Jake’s sons, because they carry his surname. But, we lose track of his daughters because of marriages.

In 1920, Jake was found in Pike County, Beat 3 in Pike County with a new wife Manda Allen? Bullock (br. 1867) and an adopted son, Robert Allen. After 1920, Jake just vanished as if he hadn’t never been present in the physical world. Here we are in the 21st Century and people still seem reluctant to talk about Jake.

Shhh……! I hear something. I am going to turn off the t.v., computer and lights. Wait a minute. Quiet ………………………………….! There it goes again …………………………………………………………………

There is something stirring in this room……! Jake, is that you?

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Mrs. Elease Bullock-Williams, We Celebrate Your Coming and Birthday

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On April 7, 2012, the Family gathered together as one to celebrate Elease’s 74th  Birthday, born April 10, 1938 to Rayford Bullock and Ola May Hutchinson of Morehouse Parish, Louisiana. Elease’s mother, Ola May, was in the lineage of the Old Man of the Louisiana Plains, Isaac (1800-1890?) and the Cherokee Woman Amanda (Mandy) Hutchinson (1836-1916) of Bastrop, Morehouse Parish, Louisiana.

Above, my impressions of the Old Man of the Louisiana Plains, Issac Hutchinson. Family folklore record that Isaac was half Irishman out of South Carolina. One of the family suggest that Isaac may have been a Civil War Veteran, 3rd Infantry Field Division. It would explain Isaac’s appearance in Morehouse Parish after the Civil War and start of his family with Mandy. Their first son Holman was born in 1868 three years after the Great War and Abolition of Slavery. Holman had been a Pony Express rider. My impression is that Holman learned horsemanship and weaponry from the Old Man Civil War Veteran. Holman didn’t take any stuff. He was involved in a gun fitght and fled Morehouse Parish and resettled in Waco, Texas. Recently, I have been informed fhat there exists family folklore that say that Mandy Hutchinson was a member of the Cherokee Nation out of North Carolina. The Hutchinson Family Legacy continue to evolve as we speak.

Ola May was the daughter of “Poor Sam” and Vinnie Reese. Poor Sam was the son of Sam Hutchinson, Sr., (1874-) of Bastrop, son of Isaac and Mandy Hutchinson. Rayford was the son of Big Papa John Bullock (1895-1971) and Ida McGowen (1898-1989) of Tylertown, Walthall County, Mississippi. During the 1930’s, the Hutchinson and Bullock Families had developed a special mutual bond, brotherhood and fellowship in and around Mer Rouge, Collingston and Bastrop.

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It was faith that brought Ola May and Rayford together, because none of us know what God’s plans should or will be. God has plans for all of his children. At the time, Rayford was married to Lela Belle Blueford. Belle was the daughter of Jerline (Jacklin) Hutchinson (1901-1997) and Luke Blueford (1900-1964). Jerline, above, was the daughter of Jack Hutchinson (1867-1930) and Belle Winfield (1872-1957).

Sam Hutchinson, Sr. and Jack Hutchinson were brothers, sons of Isaac and Mandy Hutchinson. Jerline and Poor Sam were 1stcousins. Ola May and Belle’s, named after Belle Winfield, grandparents were Isaac and Mandy Hutchinson. They were cousins. Ola May and Rayford’s union caused quite a stir around town and among the families.

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Rayford’s father, 6’-2”-6”-4” and Elease’s Paternal Grandfather,  Big Papa John Bullock, was the son of the legendary “Notorious Jake Bullock.” Jake, born 1856 had been a man of another era and world, American Slavery. At the turn of the of the 20thCentury, Jake had earned the reputation of being an infamous philanderer of Pike and Marion County, Mississippi so much so that he was called the county “Pac man.” Jake had so many relationships and children that I need to develop new and special software to record his family tree.

Papa was born out of wedlock to Jake and Lydia (Liddie) Bullock (1865-1937). Only God knows who Jake was actually married to when Papa was born in about 1895 but it wasn’t my great grandmother Liddie. Jake was so notorious he even fathered a son with Liddie’s mother, Papa’s grandmother (Alice Packwood) in 1880.

At the turn of the 20thCentury, Papa grew up among a large close knit clan of brothers and cousins, known as the philandering notorious “Bullock Boys” of Tylertown, Walthall County, Mississippi led by his brother and I believe another one of Jake’s sons by Liddie, Levi Bullock (1885-1925).

Liddie had a very special and remarkable love for Jake that only God knows and people have been writing novels and tragedies about across the ages. In developing the Bullock Family Legacy, I began with the name, Jim or Gin, from the late Great Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson as being Big Papa’s accepted father. Onetha said Papa had adamantly refused to talk about or acknowledge his real father, Jake, even among his own children.

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Above, Big Papa’s youngest son and Rayford’s brother, Honorary Bullock Family Reunion Chairperson and Organizer, Julius Bullock  (Elease’s Uncle), and Belle’s eldest daughter Mrs. Emma Sokoya (Elease’s Sister) in attendance to celebrate her 74th Birthday.

Mrs. Christina Patrick, Belle’s daughter (Elease’s sister) and Mrs. Thelma Bullock-Wiggins, Papa’s daughter (Elease’s Aunt) were also in attendance. Elease’s brother, Guy Hutchinson (Son of Ola May), and our dear cousin was also there.

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Before his death, Papa told me that he at one time he was a CC Rider (Country Circuit Preacher). Papa wasn’t as notorious with women as his father, but he told me about his horse and his blanket roll that he had liked to spread out. My impression from family folklore is that Jake had been a circuit Fiddler that also rode across the counties by horse also with that infamous “Love”  blanket roll on his horse.

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Mama (Grandmother) Ida, above, an extremely quiet, loving, spiritual and religious woman, finally had enough of Papa’s philandering and separated after one of his girlfriends tried to poison her. I found Papa to be an extremely articulate, intelligent and remarkable man of this era from the turn of the 20th Century when our men had been forbidden for generations to temper the magnificence of their true inner God given strength, beauty and divine magnetism (Love).

As for Notorious Jake, my dear maternal grandmother, Jerline Hutchinson, as others born at the turn of the 20th Century held relatives and descendants that survived American Slavery in extremely high esteem. Mama as we affectionatelly called her described them most profoundly as to have lived in “The Other World.” I take my cue from Mama. I wish that I could have the wisdon at the time to have shared more time with these most remarkable people from a by-gone era.

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Fortunately, Papa’s closest brother during most of his life, another one of Jake’s sons, the Late Sam Bullock-Quinn (1893-1975) left us with spoken folklore that Jake was tall, dark and handsome with long straight jet-black hair (Choctaw Nation of Louisiana?). Interestingly, Mandy, pictured above from about 1915, and Jack Hutchinson’s family folklore also records that they also were impressively tall, handsome with long flowing straight jet-black hair down their backs like Cherokee Nation Native Americans.

The folks of that era often thought it best to keep some skeletons like Notorious Jake in the closet and still may be reluctant to talk about things of the past. Nonetheless, it so happened that Big Papa was raised by a loving, good, dependable and sturdy step-father, Jim (James) Bullock.

Jim Bullock (1875-1953) had been yet another one of Jake’s sons. I said this to say that but for “Notorious Jake” I, Princeray,  and many of us would not have been here because the legendary Pac man of Pike-Marion (Walthall) County is our Great Grandfather and Lela Belle Blueford-Bullock was my mother. We all come from a rich, meaningful, interesting, powerful and extrordinary family background, history and legacy that has endured seas, oceans, mountiains, Slavery, and generations of troubles, struggle and love. God has a special and beautiful plans for all of his children.

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Above, the Remarkable Gwen Williams and her beloved mother. Elease said that growing up, Ola May and Rayford’s union, had caused her to be in an awkward position within the families, but they subsequently adjusted and accepted her lovingly unconditionally. In Mer Rouge or Collingston, Morehouse Parish, Elease found marriage and union with the late Lonnie Jim Williams.

On Saturday, April 7, 2012, we gathered together in San Pablo, CA with Elease’s daughters, Gwen Williams and O’netha Miles and their lovely and beautiful families as a Family United to celebrate Elease’s 74th Birthday with God’s Blessings, Wishes and our unconditionally LOVE.

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Some years ago, Elease suffered a heart attack that left her almost completely paralyzed. She is of sound mind and glowing disposition. We celebrate her Coming and Life. We pray for speedy recovery and many more joyous HAPPY BIRTHDAYS and REUNIONS.  GOD BLESS!

P.S. Ms. Gwen Williams informed me of the recent passing of our dear cousin THOMAS HUTCHINSON III in Louisiana. Recently, Thomas had been on my mind, because the Elders have called for a family reunion in 2013.  I didn’t get the opportunity to meet Thomas, but I was well aware that he had been a leader and inspiration in keeping the family together in Louisiana. I wish to take the liberty to extend our belated Condolenses and Sympathy to the THOMAS HUTCHINSON FAMILY AND LOVED ONES.   

 

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The Extraordinary Alice Packwood, A Testament to Strength

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From out of our past comes once again a story of a remarkable and resourceful woman, a testament of resiliency and strength, Alice Packwood. The late family historian, Mrs. Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson, said that Liddie (Lydia) Bullock’s father was a Brister, related to  Washington (Wash) Brister, later of Tylertown, Walthall County, Mississippi. I am still searching for her father.

The white Bristers of Lincoln County, Mississippi  were pioneer planters. I imagine that Alice so hated slavery that she ran to freedom not soon after the Great War broke out. Her last child during this period was born in the later stages of the war in 1864, ELIZA. The war had began in April 1861.There was a slave contraband camp around Bogue Chitto, the Big Creek, in Lawrence or Lincoln County where Big John’s sister in law, Deliah, worked during the war. Alice’s run for sanctuary and freedom must have ended in that contraband camp.

In 1870, Wash had adopted the surname Brister which would indicate one of the Brister Plantations as his last place of bondage in Lincoln County. In that same year, Wash was found working as a child house servant in Holmesville, Pike County, which was the station of about 100 Black Union Troops overseeing the transition from Slavery to Freedom and Reconstruction in Marion and Pike County. I envision that Wash and his family had followed the protection of Union Troops out of the Lawrence/Lincoln Slave Contraband Camps, which is where I assume that Alice had come in contact with the Black Bristers before her marriage.

Liddie, as she was commonly called, was my grandfather’s (John Bullock) mother. Family spoken folklore said that  Liddie’s mother was Alice Packwood.  The folklore of my family was confirmed when I found Liddie (Lydia) with her mother Alice in Lawrence County, Mississippi in the 1870 U.S. Census. The above is a picture of non-oppressed beauty, glory, charm and grace. It is not Alice Packwood but only a presentation of the beautiful and strong women that were once subjected to the ravages of human bondage.

My impression is that Alice was an extraordinary woman of superior strength, intelligence, independence, character and faith. Alice was robust and resourceful. She was found most of the time in and about Lawrence and Pike County working as a farm hand free and independent of men. In 1870, she was approximately 35 years old and appeared to have five (5) children.

My great grandmother, Liddie, had been the first of her children born free. I believe Liddie was actually born in Lincoln or Lawrence County sometime before the end of the Civil War in February 1865. At least, that is what she had reported in the 1900 U.S. Census. However, Liddie’s birthday around 1868 would also be of some historical significance. It would have been a couple of years after the war and the beginning of Reconstruction and some return to regional peace and family stability.

On June 27, 1870, Alice (Youngblood), age 35, married Benjamin Hammons, but appeared to be living alone with some of her children working as a farmhand in Lawrence County.

In 1870, Alice was residing with John Hammons, age 9 (br. 1861), Peter Hammons, age 5 (br. 1865) and Lydia (Liddie) Hammons (br. 1868). I couldn’t locate any information on Ben Hammons. Alice’s daughter Louise (Lucy) Packwood, age 18 (br. 1852), and son, James Packwood, age 8 (br. 1862), were living in Marion County among the House of Moses and the Bullock-Youngblood Clan with John Youngblood, age 30 (br. 1840).

In the June 1870 U.S. Census, plantation owner, Hubert (Hugh) Bullock, was at house 199, John Youngblood with Alice and James were at house 202, James Bullock, the elder, was at 207, and Moses, the Patriarch of the Bullock-Youngblood Family, was at 209. John Youngblood could have been one of Moses’ sons, Notorious Jake Bullock’s uncle. However more than likely, John may have been Judy Youngblood, age 55 (br. 1815) or Amos Youngblood’s, age 52 (br. 1818) son.

Judy and Amos was down the road at 208 and 210. Alice’s children association with the House of Moses and the Bullock-Youngblood Family Group establish that she at one time had been very close to the family in bondage and left her children within this support group at sometime at the start of the Great War. However, keep in mind that Lucy was nevertheless most likely a true “Youngblood.”  

In the 1880 U.S. Census, Alice, age 45 (br. 1835) is back in Pike County under the name of Alice Hammons. Lucy Hammons, age 25 (br. 1855) is back with Alice. Listed as daughters residing with her was Elizabeth Hammons, age 16 (br. 1864), Liddia (Liddie) Hammons, age 12 (br. 1868), Peter Hammons, age 10 (br. 1870), Angeline (Azalin), age 6 (br. 1874) and John Hammons, age 2 (br. 1878) Grandson. Her son, James Packwood, (br. 1862) would have been 18 and living apart from the family.

At this time, Alice is reported to be a widow. Ben Hammons had passed to the otherside between June 1870 and June 1880.

The Scars and Eyes of Human Bondage

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Above, these are actual true eyes of the savagery human bondage from a beautiful young woman from American Slavery. In her eyes, you can also see absolute dissociation from the unworldiless (Other World ) of Human Bondage.

The Slave Mother (1854)

By Frances E. W. Harper (1825-1911)

Heard you that shriek? It rose
So wildly on the air,
It seemed as if a burden’d heart
Was breaking in despair.

Saw you those hands so sadly clasped–
The bowed and feeble head–
The shuddering of that fragile form–
That look of grief and dread?

Saw you the sad, imploring eye?
Its every glance was pain,
As if a storm of agony
Were sweeping through the brain.

She is a mother pale with fear,
Her boy clings to her side,
And in her kirtle vainly tries
His trembling form to hide.

He is not hers, although she bore
For him a mother’s pains;
He is not hers, although her blood
Is coursing through his veins!

He is not hers, for cruel hands
May rudely tear apart
The only wreath of household love
That binds her breaking heart.

His love has been a joyous light
That o’er her pathway smiled,
A fountain gushing ever new,
Amid life’s desert wild.

His lightest word has been a tone
Of music round her heart, Their lives a streamlet blent in one–
Oh, Father! must they part?

They tear him from her circling arms,
Her last and fond embrace.
Oh! never more may her sad eyes
Gaze on his mournful face.

No marvel, then, these bitter shrieks
Disturb the listening air:
She is a mother, and her heart
Is breaking in despair.

She, above, is not unlike the unworldly perils seen, pain suffered and experienced by Alice Packwood in bondage. Family history and folklore provided by her late granddaughter, Corine Bullock (br. 1901), Alice had been separated from her family at an early age. It was so early and painful that she had no memory of them. As a child, Alice suffered greatly from the pain of her separation from her family, and cruelty of human bondage.

alicefamilylegacy

As a young child, she was a fan bearer for a cruel and mean family. A fan bearer was a house job. It was usually a young child.  His or her duty was to stand with a large flume of feathers affixed to a pole or rod and constantly fan and cool a subject of the plantation owner’s family. The fan bearer was under constant and inhumane pressure to remain standing and alert for hours.

alicefan

If the fan bearer fell from sleep, exhaustion, hunger or pain, he or she was severely beaten or punished. Clues from slave schedules suggest that the Extraordinary Alice Packwood in her infancy may have been subjected to Human Bondage on the plantation of Benjamin Youngblood in Marion County, Mississippi. Alice was born in Mississippi in 1830 about the same time as Big John.

In 1850, Mississippi Slave Schedules from the plantation of Benjamin and Joseph Youngblood show a twenty year old female in bondage. Slave schedules recorded no other information about people held in bondage other than age and gender, but the slave records were consistent with a young lady of Alice’s age being subjected on the Youngblood plantation. It is extremely important to always keep in mind  that the Youngblood Plantation was adjacent to Hugh Bullock’s Plantation someplace near the town of Columbia, Marion County along a fertile river crescent.

After the abolition of slavery, Alice and Lucy used both Youngblood and Packwood as their surnames until Hammons’ marriage. Lucy Youngblood, Alice’s eldest known daughter, was born sometime between 1852-1855 on the Youngblood Plantation in servitude, a child of the Other World.

I believe that it is safe to assume that Alice being a robust and fertile woman had become separated from Lucy while in bondage from the Youngblood plantation. The most likely last place of Alice’s bondage by the clue of the surname that she adopted after the abolition of slavery was on the plantation of Dudley W. Packwood,  most likely inherited by his son, Joseph H. Packwood.

Dudley Packwood arrived rather late in Pike County in about 1850. He first settled on the farm of an early Pike County settler, Ralph Stovall. Dudley was born in 1782 in New London, Connecticut. He traveled to New Orleans, and was in the Battle of New Orleans with Andrew Jackson. He lived in Louisiana and Alabama before migrating to Mississippi. Dudley’s father, Joseph, was a sea captain during the Revolutionary War. Dudley’s wife was Catherine Elliot, born 1803 in Maryland. Dudley lived in region of Pike County called China Grove. He died sometime in 1860 at 76, Catherine died sometime in 1873.

Recall that Lucy Youngblood was born sometime around 1854. It is possible that Alice suffered another painful separation from family soon after the birth of Lucy. Dudley’s eldest son, Joseph H. Packwood, born 1836, was also a farmer and merchant and spent his life in China Grove, Pike County from 1850 to his death in 1900.

Joseph married Mary Youngblood, born 1844. Mary was the daughter of Joseph Youngblood above, and Eliza Bickham. It is possible that Alice may have followed Mary as dowry, the property which a woman brings her husband at marriage. Lucy most probably remained on the Youngblood plantation. We know that the eldest son of Joseph and Mary Packwood was born July 3, 1863.

In 1860, Dudley had 13 human beings subjected on his farm. The oldest female in servitude was a 22 year old mulatto. Alice would been about 30 years old. Therefore, Alice may have arrived on the Packwood farm sometime after 1860. It is likely, and most probable that Mary Youngblood and Joseph Packwood was married sometime in 1862 after Mary’s eighteen birthday, and Alice followed Mary as “dowry”. Recall that Alice’s son, Peter, was born in 1862 in bondage as a “Packwood.”  It is also likely that Alice’s daughter, ELIZA (br. 1864) may also have been born on the Packwood Plantation.  

In 1870, 5 (five) years from abolition of slavery, Alice was a farm hand in Lawrence County working on the plantation of Joseph Youngblood, one of Ben Youngblood’s sons.

Another clue as to Alice’s last place of bondage on the Packwood Plantation involves again, Notorious Jake.  In 1880, Alice and her family had moved back to Pike County. Her husband, Ben Hammons, had passed. At some point in 1880, Jake rode up. Jake had to have known Alice and the kids from one of the surrounding Youngblood-Packwood plantations, Ante Bellum Bondage.

Jake most likely would have been on horse back. He would have made quite an early lasting impression on 10 or 12 year old Liddie. A brief description of Jake as dark with long straight jet black hair came from his son, Sam Bullock, who later adopted the surname “Quinn.” Sam and my grandfather, John Bullock, were close as brothers should be and equally perplexed about being the seed of Notorious Jake. There wasn’t much difference between their ages. They bonded with each other for a lifetime of brotherhood, moral support and comfort. Sam and John married sisters, Ethel and Ida, from the morally strict and deeply religious Alex-Miley McGowen Family of Pike County.

I imagine that Jake was long and tall like my grandfather. John stood about 6.3 feet. Jake was lean and tall, dark and handsome with long straight jet black hair. He was iron chiseled muscular with a straight back and haunting piecing dark brown-deep penerating and spiritual eyes like his daughter, Josie Bullock, above, that seemed to see through you.

Jake would have rode up to Alice’s place morning, day or night. Jake was vain. Jake was out of the House of Moses. During the Great War, Pike and Marion Counties wasn’t touched much other than the loss of white males that entered the war on the side of Confederacy. Union troops destroyed some of railroad stations around Columbia, Mississippi near the plantation, but there wasn’t very much other action in the area. After the war, plantation owners Hugh Bullock and Hosea Davis were still among the wealthy and influential planter class. Jake’s grandfather, Moses Bullock, was also considerately well off as an ex-bondsman.  In 1870, between Moses and his son, Amos Youngblood, reported about $1,000 in assets.

At Jake’s back was Big John and Ellen and the House of Moses. They appeared to be the backbone of the wealthly and influential planter class of Marion and Pike County. Jake was vain. He wasn’t beyond throwing his weight around the county.

Out of the Alice and Jake union, a son was born. Alice named him, Dudley. Dudley Packwood? In 1920, Dudley (Dud) was found residing in Pike County with his wife, Lada (Leola), age 35 (br. 1885), Hattie, age 13 (br. 1907), Mattie, age 11 (br. 1909), John, age 7 (br. 1913), Bennee, age 5 (br. 1915) and Della, age 3 months (br. 1920).  Mrs. Onetha Bullock-Hutchinson reported that Dud’s son, John, had moved to California and lost touch.

O.D. Smith, son of Angeline Bullock-Smith (br. 1884), the daughter of Liddie and George Bullock, said that Dud was part of the infamous “Bullock Boys” at the turn of the century. He said that “Dud, Levi, John and Lonzo. were too touch for me!” O.D. thought that Pack Bullock (Notorious Jake) was his grandfather instead of George, Sr. Recall that George, Jr. was was born in 1893 so I believe that George was Angeline’s father.But O.D. would know more than I about his mother. Angeline passed around 1937.

It is possible that Liddie most likely first met her future husband, George Bullock (br. 1861) of Lincoln-Lawrence County with Jake during the early 1880s. Both George and Jake rode together. They were extremely handsome young men of the time, and part of the 19th Century infamous “Bullock Boys.”

One thing is historically cystral clear, Lidde Brister-Bullock loved the “Bullock Boys.” At this time, I have been unable to find when and where the Remarkable Alice passed or the fate of any of Liddie’s brothers and sisters. Alice was an extremely strong and remarkable woman of her time forever scarred by human bondage. I call her name once again, GREAT-GREAT GRANDMOTHER, ALICE PACKWOOD, YOU WERE AN EXTRAORDINARY HUMAN BEING.  

 

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